First look: Six-story apartment/retail complex proposed in Lakewood

The current footprint held by Teter's Faucet Parts on Oram in Lakewood. (Photo by Danny Fulgencio)
The current footprint held by Teter’s Faucet Parts on Oram in Lakewood. (Photo by Danny Fulgencio)

Developer Southern Land Company sought public input before bringing its six-story, high-density retail/apartment proposal on Oram to the city. While City Councilman Philip Kingston said recently he has not yet been approached by the principals on the project, neighbors got an early look at the new plans last week.

The proposal would change the skyline of Lakewood, bringing the towering building where the one-story, 6,200-square-foot Teter’s Faucet Part has sat since 1947. The new plans include a retail section on the first floor topped with five stories of residential units, 140 in total at about 975-square-feet a piece. That would mean an uptick in density, current zoning allows for a floor area ratio of 1.5:1, while this project seeks to increase that to 3.45:1.

An architectural rendering of the proposed six-story building at 6337 Oram.
An architectural rendering of the proposed six-story building at 6337 Oram.

Two stories of underground parking would support the building, although only one parking stall is provided per unit and the total number of spots has not yet been decided. There would also be “head-in parking” for shoppers on Oram. In total, the project is predicted to bring 2,682 cars per day coming and going on the quiet street. Southern Land Company would also add sidewalks, crosswalks and landscaping to improve walkability around the project.
Current zoning at the Teter’s site, governed by Planning District 281, allows for up to five-stories (75-feet in height) of mixed-use development. The proposed project calls for six-stories at 75-feet “plus mechanicals,” which paired with the increased density, means developers will need a zoning exemption to make this vision a reality.

If successful, it would be one of the first projects in the neighborhood required to comply with the city’s new affordable housing ordinance, led by East Dallas Councilman Mark Clayton, which obligates developers who increase density to dedicate 10 percent of their units to affordable housing. In Lakewood, market rate for rentals ranges from $650 for a studio to $1,660 for a four-bedroom unit (see the full list of 2017 city market rates by zip code).

In total, the new project is expected to generate more than $830,000 annually in property taxes, versus the $22,000 at Teter’s.

Top, the current view of Zoe's Kitchen. Below, a rendering of how it would look with the proposed Oram project.
Top, the current view of Zoe’s Kitchen. Below, a rendering of how it would look with the proposed Oram project.

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  • Pol Pot

    A valet stand?

  • Pol Pot

    NIMBY = Not In My Back Yard.

    An idea that sounds good, but just not in my back yard. You know, things like high density mixed-use New Urbanism. The term NIMBY is actually fairly common in discussions of multi-family housing.
    Also, while you may believe there is plenty of multi-family housing I (and the property owner) would bet that the market will say more multi-family housing in desired.
    –Brother Number One

  • Los_Politico

    I know! People might only be able to travel 30 mph!! The speed limit! The horror! And what if the pedestrian count increases! How will I ever get home?!

  • Los_Politico

    Who would have thought Papa John’s would be a bar?

  • CitizenKane

    There won’t be a bar approved at that location.

  • Hollene

    I think you misunderstand the meaning of NIMBY. It’s meant to apply to necessary but messy or dangerous things outside the zone of an existing place, like a prison, a manufacturing plant, waste disposal, etc. We have plenty of multi-family housing in our neighborhood (this one is just overly large and if replicated could turn 75214 into what the State & Main area is like).

  • Hollene

    No, no, no. PLEASE no. The intersections can’t handle that amount of traffic. Those wonky angles along Gaston and Abrams make our neighborhood interesting, but they’re already a mess during rush hour and during the holidays. 2,600+ more would wreck the area.

  • Los_Politico

    Not $10M worth of parts. A single bar in the retail portion of the building will likely produce more tax revenue than Teeter’s ever has.

    This will have a real impact on the bottom line of the city. Do this a hundred times over and we might fix some pot holes one day

  • Los_Politico

    you know that’s not a thing

  • Los_Politico

    It’s possible to be married in Dallas and have one car– crazy right!?!

    This is also less than a mile to Woodrow. It’s unlikely that anyone with the values to be a 3 car household would be interested in living a walkable urban lifestyle anyway.

  • Los_Politico

    This is zoned to Lee and we all know the traffic numbers are inflated. And as to retail, speak for yourself, I could use a new pub.

  • East Dallas Newb

    For starters, they will put one of those stupid B_G signs out front. ; )

  • Cissy Aberg

    Neighborhood would get more traffic and agreed, that area from La Vista up through where Lakewood Blvd. turns into Belmont is challenging to get through…on foot, bike or automobile. But something like this would certainly go a long way to creating a “critical mass” that is so important in making urban developments successful. They need people that stay and people that visit and leave. P

    Certainly, public and private transportation should be thought out, planned and executed. And for comparison’s sake, I recently moved from Lakewood to an older high rise in Uptown and I do have two spaces for my small unit.

    However, projections say that once we get to driver-less cars, parking won’t be so much a problem because cars can and will serve more than one person, so a lot of these big lots will be half-empty. I’m skeptical, but hopeful, too.

  • Tax credits have not been discussed yet as far as I know. What I am referring to is a new City of Dallas ordinance that requires residential projects that increase density to dedicate 10% of their units to affordable housing. You can read more on that here: https://lakewood.advocatemag.com/2016/11/01/trading-increased-density-for-affordable-housing/

  • Sheri Stinson Beach

    Will there be Underground security?

  • Sheri Stinson Beach

    If a married couple, they’ll need two parking spots, teenagers going to Woodrow could make one household have the need for 3 spots!! This could be for several of the units. Think ahead!

  • CitizenKane

    The article is mis-leading; In addition to property taxes, Teeters contributes to the sales tax revenues of the city. Teeter’s sells alot of plumbing parts out of that small location.

  • CitizenKane

    Emily. you sure this isn’t a low-income tax credit deal?

    Not certain, but the only voucher program I am aware of is Section 8. I don’t think this project will be Section 8 housing.

    https://www.huduser.gov/portal/datasets/lihtc.html

  • CitizenKane

    Seriously, 2,682 daily car trips along Oram? The Oram-Gaston intersection is a mess.

    This is a very bad deal for the neighborhood; we get nothing out of this deal.

    The Seller gets an inflated land valuation (presumably) due to the up-zoning density. The developer gets a great zoning package that sweets his ROI to almost zero risks. The city gets more tax revenues.

    What does the neighborhood get out of this? More traffic on our poorly maintained roads, more density, Retail services we don’t need? More overcrowding at Lakewood Elementary?

  • I only seek to clarify because many have said the affordable housing ordinance financially penalizes landlords, when in reality they charge the exact same amount. The only difference is that they are paid in part by the tenant and part by vouchers, versus it all coming from the tenant in “traditional rentals.” I’m sure you know all this, but just for anyone else reading this thread.

  • Los_Politico

    Emily, no one can ever (successfully) charge “over market rate” for anything. Subsidized housing, affordable housing, below market rate housing, it’s all the same. It means some lucky duck gets a home for less than you or I could in an open market. And it’s a trade off I think we should make to increase the density and walkability of our little burg.

  • To be clear, “affordable housing” is not “below market housing,” it just means that they can’t charge over market rate for 10% of the units because government subsidies will only cover market rate rentals.

  • Los_Politico

    They’re also increasing the FAR, but if that’s not allowed they’ll just build a surface parking lot. We get underground parking, walkable retail, and below market housing in exchange. It’s a pretty good deal and what we need to become more of a ‘village’.

  • Pol Pot

    If I understand this correctly, they could have five stories without a variance so long as the “mechanicals” aren’t above 75 feet, they also wouldn’t need to include 10% affordable housing. So the trade off is to allow 6 stories within the 75 feet but put the AC units, etc. above the 75 foot mark and provide some affordable housing.

    Parking is an interesting issue. With retail on the first floor and the close proximity to Whole Foods and a couple of other shopping centers, this would be a walkable area for residents. Seems like the classic New Urbanism vs. NIMBY argument.
    –Brother Number One

  • Los_Politico

    And what would make the design say “Dallas!”?

  • plsiii

    I’m with you on the parking. & if it’s underground that’d be the only thing attractive about this project. The rendering screams everywhere USA.

  • David Shinn

    How does this bode for transparency and inclusion?? Again, the last meeting held to present the project was an INVITATION ONLY event………It’s got to be better than this. Sorry.

  • David Shinn

    FOR

  • David Shinn

    BODE

  • David Shinn

    THAT

  • David Shinn

    hOW’S

  • David Shinn

    The recent meeting held to unveil this project was an INVITATION ONLY event!!

  • David Shinn

    and EVERY aspect of how it will affect, alter, or change neighborhoods needs to be discussed in an open and transparent manner.

  • David Shinn

    The surrounding streets cannot support the increased traffic. Where’s the traffic plan, and environmental study to show how the increased traffic would affect neighborhood streets?? When you look at the location how do car get into and out of the project?? Think about the adjacent streets….Kidwell??? Alderson??? Density’s fine as long as it fits into existing neighborhood andEVERY ALL affects have been

  • Robert Graham

    they need much more parking, and the spaces need to be full size and not the small sized compact car spaces…

  • Pretty sure they’re looking at apartments, Los_Politico.

  • Los_Politico

    No they don’t, this isn’t Frisco

  • Dena Farnsworth

    They need more than one parking space per unit, especially if they are including retail.

  • Los_Politico

    Looks like an attractive project, glad they decided to do underground parking. Have they said if the apartments will be rentals or condo?