Día de los Muertos — translated as Day of the Dead — is an annual holiday observed on Nov. 1 in Mexico and parts of Latin America. You might guess that the holiday is somber, however, the day is actually a cheerful celebration of loved ones who have passed. Colorful skeletons, sugar skulls, and brightly decorated altars are just a few trademarks of the annual tradition.

The Bath House Cultural Center’s 28th annual Día de los Muertos exhibition, which continues through Nov. 15, sets out to create a deeper awareness and understanding of the celebration through the display of works from Latino and non-Latino visual artists alike.

This year’s theme is “The Eternal Melody,” paying homage to the holiday’s richly inherent musical manifestations with works from more than 60 artists.

I stopped by the artists reception on Sunday and met a handful of those artists. Get a sneak peek of what to expect at the exhibit below:

Casa Linda UMC senior program coordinator says that this mixed media piece, titled "La Musica por Dentro," means "the music inside." Seniors from the church program each included their favorite musicians in the piece.

Casa Linda UMC senior program coordinator says that this mixed media piece, titled “La Musica por Dentro,” means “the music inside.” Seniors from the church program each included their favorite musicians in the piece. This is the second year the seniors have contributed to the exhibition.

Arlington artist Chandra Armstead poses in front of her creation, “Paper Dolls.” Armstead has contributed to the exhibition for nine years. She volunteers with youth in her community, works at TI, and is also a weight lifter in addition to her creative endeavors.

Arlington artist Chandra Armstead poses in front of her creation, “Paper Dolls.” Armstead has contributed to the exhibition for nine years. She volunteers with youth in her community, works at TI, and is also a weight lifter in addition to her creative endeavors.

Eva Pena’s “Baila Hasta Morir” on acrylic

Eva Pena’s “Baila Hasta Morir” on acrylic

Artist Kate Schatz poses in front of her piece "De Colores." The mixed media piece displays the actual music notes from the popular children's song "De Colores." Schatz teaches at  Northridge Elementary in Richardson ISD and her sister co-owns Gecko Hardware. This is her 13th year displaying artwork in the show.

Artist Kate Schatz poses in front of her piece “De Colores.” The mixed media piece displays the actual music notes from the popular children’s song “De Colores.” Schatz teaches at Northridge Elementary in Richardson ISD and her sister co-owns Gecko Hardware. This is her 13th year displaying artwork in the show.

The lobby of the Bath House Cultural Center was packed with spectators during the opening reception.

The lobby of the Bath House Cultural Center was packed with spectators during the opening reception.

Musicians Kim Corbet, a professor at SMU , and singer Lisa Huffaker provided the music for the evening.

Musician and SMU professor Kim Corbet provided the music for the evening with singer Lisa Huffaker.

Visit the exhibit yourself during museum hours. Admission is free — that is unless you purchase any of the pieces of art, all of which are up for sale.


WANT MORE?
Click to sign up for the Advocate's weekly news digest and be the first to know what’s happening in Lakewood/East Dallas.