Compromise in White Rock lights fight?

Dallas Parks and Recreation department is proposing what seems to be a fair compromise in the whole lighting White Rock Lake debacle — they are called Night Sky Cut Off lights.

"Night Sky Cut Off means all the light goes down to the ground," Parks rep Willis Winters told CBS 11 news.  "So if you’re flying over the lake in the evening, you don’t see a bare lamp. You can physically constrict the light with a hood of some type by forcing it to the ground."

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  • trinie


    Every negative comment you make speaks volumes about WHY your perspective is contrary to the good of WRL. The majority of voices vote to LEAVE THE LAKE ALONE! Plagiarism is the best compliment.

  • Wilson!

    The fact that dark-sky conducive lights weren’t the initial choice says a lot about where the parks dept priorities are. Those are the only type of lights to even consider in a park.

    As for those decrying the installation of lights at all, as it’ll spoil the night time sky, view of the shore line, whatever: Wake up, folks. YOU LIVE IN A CITY!!! You want pristine, unspoiled wilderness? Cooper lake is just over an hour away, and it doesn’t have a city of over 1 million souls encircling it.

  • JanM

    The poles already spoil the views, come around the bend,there’s a bunch of poles. They’ve trimmed the trees into lollipops, paved everything they couldn’t cut. When they get finished spiffing up the spillway, you’ll think you’re in a Walmart parking lot, not a park. Goodbye, White Rock, glad I knew you when.

  • Jason

    skywatcher, Flag Pole Hill is not too far away. That would be a good vantage point to see the meteor showers or moonrise.

  • skywatcher

    My husband and I had gone to TeePee hill many evenings to find somewhere dark to watch the full moon rise or see other night sky events. Seemed to always be several others with same intent. Where will we take kids to see the meteor showers, drive to Tyler or West Texas?

  • meredith

    Louise and BAH, how often do you visit White Rock Lake at night and what do you do there when you do? I’m not calling you out or anything…just naturally curious and trying to see where you are coming from.

  • Susan

    Say goodbye to that special feeling:

    My first instinct to the lighting at the WR Lake would be – don’t mess with White Rock Lake. But with some realization of what the lake looked like for so many years and the fact that Dallas is as Dallas does, not sure that anything can stop the installation at this point.

    The lights will certainly change the view and the serene feel of the lake (from the lake to the shoreline) while night sailing. Something that was quite unique and enjoyable with-out extra lighting.

  • BAH


  • Louise

    I vote NO lights at night! It’s all an intrusion of more pollution.

  • chris

    Excellent. This is a good step. Compromise is a beautiful thing. You can have mild lighting at the lake without making it look like a Wal Mart parking lot and if they use sensors or dimmers to kill it after midnight or dim when people aren’t around then you minimize electricity costs while providing people an opportunity to use the lake at night without tripping over something.

  • Matt

    The KERA Think radio show had an episode about this with an interview and discussion of the previously mentioned National Geographic article…

    “[2008-11-10 12:00:00] Where has the darkness gone? With the current National Geographic Magazine cover story “Our Vanishing Night” as our starting point, we’ll discuss the importance of darkness with Pete Strasser, Senior Technical Advisor at the International Dark Sky Association.”

    In the segment they talk about typical outdoor/street lighting, full-cutoff lighting fixtures, and other cities that have implemented codes regarding light pollution.

    If you interested, you can listen to the show here…